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Using courtesy and common sense

Using courtesy and common sense

Every boat equipped with a motor other than a stock (unmodified) outboard engine must have a muffler and use it while operating within five nautical miles (9.26 km) of shore. This does not apply to you if your boat was built before January 1, 1960, or if you are in an official competition, in formal training or final preparation for an official competition.

Muffler - Boat

Stay alert! At high speeds, it’s hard to see swimmers, water skiers, divers as well as other vessels in time to avoid them. Moreover, don’t forget that when you are on the water, it is important to know the depth of water, in order to avoid damaging the engine propeller. In the event that you must recover a person overboard, do not forget to shut down the engines. 

It is important to stay away from swimming areas to avoid the risk of injury to swimmers. A boat’s wake can damage other vessels, docks and the shoreline. It can also be a risk for swimmers, divers and people on small boats which could capsize. Pay attention to of how your boat’s wake might affect others when determinig your speed. You will be responsible for any damages or harm you cause.

Oil, fuel, antifreeze and transmission fluids are a few examples of pollutants that harm the environment when pumped overboard — usually by automatic bilge pumps. In fact, a regulation prohibits the discharge or disposal of fuel, oil, antifreeze and other harmful substances such as cleaning agents in the water. Bilge cleaners, even biodegradable ones, just break down the oil into tiny, less visible droplets. Absorbent bilge cloths are very useful because they are designed to absorb petroleum products and repel water.

Pollution

Here are a few tips to help keep bilge pollution to a minimum. Unfortunately invasive species, such as zebra mussels and green crab, have taken over certain local waters. You can do your part by keeping your hull clean. This is very important if you operate your boat on a lake or river and then tow it over land to use in another area. Rinsing or cleaning your hull after use or before entering new waters helps to remove spores and other invasive organisms.

Aquatic nuisance species

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