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Nautical knots

Figure eight bend

Figure eight bend

The Flemish bend, also known as a figure eight bend, a double figure eight bend, and a rewoven figure eight is a knot for joining two ropes of roughly similar size.

A loose figure-eight knot is tied in the end of one rope. The second rope is now threaded backwards parallel to the first rope. When properly dressed, the two strands do not cross each other.

Although fairly secure, it is susceptible to jamming. If tied, dressed and stressed properly it does not need "stopper" or "safety" knots.

Anchor bend

Anchor bend

The Anchor Bend is a knot used for attaching a rope to a ring or similar termination. While the knot can become jammed in some modern materials, it is usually easily untied after moderate loads; it can be made more resistant to jamming by taking an extra turn around the object--this will make for a 1-diameter longer span of the end to reach around the standing part to be tucked. It is the accepted knot for attaching anchors to warps. The knot is very similar to a round turn and two half hitches except that the first half hitch is passed under the turn.  

Half hitches knot

Half hitches knot

A Round Turn and Two Half Hitches is useful for attaching a mooring line to a dock post or ring although probably less secure than the Anchor (Fisherman's) Hitch.  

Bowline knot

Bowline knot

The Bowline makes a reasonably secure loop in the end of a piece of rope. It has many uses, e.g., to fasten a mooring line to a ring or a post. Under load, it does not slip or bind. With no load it can be untied easily.

Two bowlines can be linked together to join two ropes. Its principal shortcoming is that it cannot be tied, or untied, when there is a load on the standing end. It should therefore be avoided when, for example, a mooring line may have to be released under load.

The bowline is sometimes referred as King of the knots because of its importance. It is one of the four basic maritime knots 

Fisherman's knot

Fisherman's knot

Reef knot

Reef knot

Although the reef knot is often seen used for tying two ropes together, it is not recommended for this purpose because of the potential instability of the knot, and over-use has resulted in many deaths.

Used by sailors for reefing and furling sails. 

Clove Hitch knot

Clove Hitch knot

This knot is particularly useful where the length of the running end needs to be adjustable, since feeding in rope from either direction will loosen the knot to be tightened at a new position. With certain types of cord, the clove hitch can slip when loaded.  

Halyard bend

Halyard bend

Halyard bend is a way to attach the end of a rope at right angle to a cylindrical object such as a beam.

Monkey fist

Monkey fist

Turning a cleat

Turning a cleat

The Cleat Hitch secures a rope to a cleat.